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Comparing the new Power9 9009-41G vs the 9009-41A

Comparing the new Power9 9009-41G vs the 9009-41A
What's the difference between the new IBM S914 9009-41G and 9009-41A Power9 models? The only difference is the newer 9009-41G S914 model was built entirely with fourth generation PCIe technology, capable of delivering much better I/O performance, bandwidth and faster data transfers. The number of Gen4 PCIe slots vary based on the Power9 configuration, but the 9009-41G supports up to fourteen PCIe4 devices, eleven 6.4 TB Non-Volatile Memory express (NVMe) Solid State Drives for a total of 70.4 TB of usable NVMe SSD storage for an IBM i, AIX, Linux server or VIOS partition.     Performance gains of a IBM S914 9009-41G compared to a 9009-41A The 9009-41G performance gains to be had over its 9009-41A predecessor are in the backplane, storage and controller options selected. Compared to a SAS or SATA SSD, NVMe solid state drives provide significantly better read and write performance (latency), IOPS and bandwidth compared to SATA and traditional SAS SSDs. IBM NVMe SSDs (a.k.a. NVMe Flash Adapters) are directly connected to the Gen4 PCIe bus, and are assigned to a specific LPAR as a device. Whereas traditional SATA and SAS SSDs must rely on a controller and is shared with all the storage it manages.From a performance comparison perspective, NVMe SSDs can utilize most of the available bandwidth supported by the Power9 Gen4 PCIe slot which maxes out at 8 Gb per NVMe SSD, compared to only 6-12 Gb per storage controller (which must also be shared between all of the managed drives), and Gen3 PCIe has a 4 Gb/s maximum. Therefore, a Power9 SATA SSD could potentially achieve 200,000 IOPS on its best second, where as an NVMe SSD in an PCIe Gen4 slot can achieve over 1,000,000 IOPS. It is also important to note, the Power9 must also have the required V7R4 to use NVMe SSDs and other necessary PTFs and Firmware updates to achieve these performance gains.    Storage configuration options for the 9009-41G 41G Storage Options12 SAS HDD/SSD + RDX or 18 SAS HDD/SSD or 6 SAS HDD/SDD + 2 NVMe U.2 + RDX or 4 NVMe U.241A Storage Options12 or 18 SAS HDD/SSD or 4...
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Is Power9 the best performing Linux server? Q&A With IBM Gold Partner, Midland Information Systems plus real world examples.

Linux-Servers
  IBM Power9 Servers may be the best Linux server to run your applications. IBM Power Linux servers have a proven history of delivering over twice the performance per core compared to industry leading x86 server brands. IBM Power Linux servers have also proven to deliver the lowest cost of ownership compared to other Linux servers running on x86 hardware. Although there is no one single answer to this question, the two statements address what most people want to know when comparing Linux server workloads, such as: application server, database server, cloud server, SAP server, analytics server, business intelligence server, web server, media server, HCI or like x86 workloads. IBM Power Linux Server Q&A The questions and answers in this article are based on real-life business scenarios, independent x86 Linux server comparison case studies, industry experts, competitor specifications, vendor testing and other fact based benchmark laboratory testing results. The questions revolve around the important business decisions companies must make about how to lower licensing costs, operating costs and/or how to improve application response times for business units. Fact: 80 percent of the Fortune 100 companies use IBM Power Systems. Q: What applications can I run on a IBM Power Linux Server? A: Any x86 Linux server application running on Ubuntu Server, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and RedHat Enterprise Linux is supported. In addition, the community versions of Linux server like Debian, openSUSE, CentOS, Fedora and others can also run on IBM Power Linux servers. Q: Does an IBM Power9 Linux server cost more than an x86 server? A: Yes, maybe and no. When comparing the upfront hardware costs of purchasing a IBM Power Linux server solution to a comparable x86 server solution, x86 hardware may be at times less expensive and sometimes not. However, after accounting for lower licensing costs, reliability, implementation time, scalability, performance, ongoing management and security, IBM Power9 Linux servers have a much lower cost of ownership compared to alternative x86 servers. Q: Why does a IBM Power Linux server have a lower TCO compared to an x86 server? A: IBM Power systems provide better performance per core,...
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IBM i Saves Money for Companies in Multiple Ways

IBM i Saves Money for Companies in Multiple Ways
From its inception in the 1980s, the IBM AS400 and OS400 operating system has had many iterations and transformations over the years, but it has consistently maintained the distinguished honor of delivering businesses the lowest TCO midrange computing system in the industry. To this day, tens of thousands of businesses, including the largest companies in the world rely on the IBM i to run their most critical applications. There is no single reason, but collectively, the entire IBM i package of hardware, operating system, integrated database and all the features they encompass and provide businesses, is what contributes to the extremely low total cost of ownership that no other midrange computing system can provide. The IBM i POWER system platform itself, is a turnkey business system that requires almost zero IT staff to maintain on a daily basis. Case in point, a number of companies over the years have contacted Midland for assistance for a system no one at the company knew existed, until the day something stopped working. This triggered a man hunt, a door to a small closet being opened for the first time in recent history, and the discovery of a very dusty black box. These systems ran for a decade or more without a single failure, and in some instances, did not require any human interaction. Some of these older systems included System/36’s from the 1980s and first generation AS/400s from the 1990s. Hearing stories like these are amazing testaments to the rock solid architecture that is today known as the IBM i. Not to mention, these types of stories are completely unheard of for other midrange platforms. The key elements why businesses should consider an IBM i, and why executives might want to think twice before migrating off the IBM i:  - Lower License Costs - Lower Personnel Costs - Less Downtime - Faster Application Response Times From the outset, OS/400 was designed for ease of use, a key factor that has continued to save businesses money on system and database administration tasks. Most IBM i administration functions are automated today, with self-healing, self-configuring, self-tuning, self-protecting and like management...
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IBM POWER8 vs. POWER9 Comparison for 2021

IBM POWER8 vs. POWER9 Comparison for 2021
IBM Server upgrades – always a tough call. Should you invest in a new POWER server if your workloads are running just fine on an earlier model? Perhaps, as the new POWER9 servers received a major performance boost thanks to improved hardware, memory, and enhanced on-chip acceleration. In this post, we’ll show exactly how POWER9 compares to POWER8 in terms of memory, CPU, TCO and overall performance. Let’s dive in! POWER8 vs POWER9: Tech Specifications and Main Improvements POWER9 with comes loads of new hardware. Some are enterprise-grade, other are more focused on small to mid-range applications. The latter include Power9 models S922, S914, and S924 as well as Linux and SAP Hana specialized variants, the L922, L924, H922, and H924. Every new model comes equipped with robust POWER9 processors: Source: IBM Here’s a quick comparison chart further illustrating how POWER9 hardware stacks against POWER8 and POWER7: Arguably, the biggest advantage of a new POWER9 server over POWER8 is the new hardware acceleration platform consisting of the following: Enhanced on-chip acceleration – Gzip x1, 842 Compression x2, AES/SHA x2.PowerAXON – a collection of high-speed I/O interconnects operating at a signaling rate of 25 GT/s. The AXON stands for A-bus, X-bus, OpenCAPI, and NVLink.Nvidia NVLink 2.0 – the upgraded lane can communicate at 25Gbps in the first iteration.CAPI 2.0 – can help achieve four times the bandwidth of POWER8 in combination with PCIe Gen 4. Secondly, IBM gave POWER9 pipeline a trim and reduced it to 12-stages: 5 stages were removed from fetch to compute, and from fixed-point operations.IBM eliminated instruction grouping at dispatch.Hazard avoidance and reduced hazard disruption received an upgrade. So what do all of these hardware upgrades mean in terms of performance and stability? Here are a few quick TLDs before we dive into the specs: Compared to POWER8, POWER9 has 1.5x better performance and 2x more memory.POWER9 comes with 1.8x more memory bandwidth per socket and up to 57% lower solution cost.In general, IBM state-of-the-art servers are 18x times more reliable than those from other companies.  POWER 8 vs. POWER9 Performance Compared With a new system series comes new Power...
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IBM Power Solid State Drives SSD

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 How to increase IBM POWER System application performance running on IBM i, AIX and Linux Server with SSDs (Solid State Drives) Every IBM POWER System application performs significantly faster running on SSD (microsecond and nanosecond response times, compared to millisecond and seconds). Application performance on IBM POWER Systems experiencing slow query responses times, have intensive I/O requirements or are experiencing latency as a result of accessing data on hard disk drives, can improve performance using various database and query approaches. However, the most effective and usually quickest approach is to replace traditional HHDs with IBM Solid State Drives (SSD) using either Enterprise or Mainstream SSDs, depending on read and write requirements. Solid state drives have been available for IBM POWER Systems since IBM released the first POWER5 models, although the initial SSDs were cost prohibitive for most companies. Since their initial release, time and the refurbished market has made IBM SSDs cost effective for any company needing a quick and simple performance upgrade. In comparison to hard disk drives, SSDs run at the speed of memory capable of delivering tens of thousands more I/O operations per second for any IBM POWER System, providing queries, I/O intensive applications and aging IBM i, Linux Servers and AIX Power servers a massive performance boost. As a result, IBM POWER Systems can typically be configured to replace HDDs with a lot less SSDs and still achieve huge I/O performance boost and reduce related hardware costs of expansion units and IBM hardware maintenance. IBM Enterprise SSDs with eMLC (for write intensive database applications) and Mainstream SSDs (for read intensive with no more than 1 write per day) do not have the seek time performance bottlenecks of hard disk drives. IBM i POWER systems have a built in storage manager for the DB2 database that simplify and automate how data is used between ASPs, Libraries, DB2 database and physical storage types available utilizing preferences and calculations for maximum response times and performance costs that impact CPU and I/O. IBM SSDs provide users with almost instantaneous access to DB2 data, removing latency and I/O performance bottlenecks HDD spinning platters and arms cause. What are...
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IBM HMC Model Specifications and Comparisons

IBM-7042-CR9-IBM-7042-CR9-Hardware-Management-Console
The IBM Hardware Management Console (HMC) is a virtual hardware appliance used to manage and monitor IBM i, AIX and Linux server workloads running on Power9, Power8, Power7, Power6 and Power5 Systems. The IBM HMC uses built in terminal emulation software to connect and control Power system resources, services, virtualization features and order Capacity Upgrade on Demand. The IBM HMC can consolidate the monitoring and management of all Power systems in a company’s infrastructure that is supported by the HCM code. Every HCM model supports different Power system models based on the version of HMC code. For instance, the latest HCM models 7063-CR1, 7042-CR9, CR8, CR7, OE1 and OE2 all support Power9, Power8 and Power7 systems when running V9R1 HMC code, but not do not support IBM Power6 system models. If same the HMC has V8.8.7 code installed (which does not support Power9 system models), the HCM can also connect and manage Power6 systems. Similar to the HMC virtual hardware appliance, customers may choose to use HMC functions on a PowerVM-based environment running on a PowerLinux LPAR and using PowerVM NovaLink software. The IBM HMC hardware appliance and the PowerVM NovaLink features function the same as the HMC appliance. The PowerVM NovaLink uses a cloud architecture, that provides a direct OpenStack connection to a PowerVM server running on a PowerLinux partition. IBM provides upgrades for HMC code for each model, which can be downloaded from IBM Fix Central. The latest IBM HMC appliance model specifications and comparisons are provided in the below chart, and should be considered before upgrading your IBM Power system or purchasing a HMC. IBM HMC Model Specifications and Comparisons (in Newest to Oldest order)HMC ModelHMC CodePower GenerationProcessorMemoryDisk SpaceEthernetUSB PCI-XPCIePCI7063-CR1V9R1 M9xxPower9, 8 & 72.095 GHz32 GB4 TB547063-CR1V8.8.7Power8, 7 & 67042-OE2V9R1 M9xxPower9, 8 & 77042-OE2V8.8.7Power8, 7 & 67042-OE1V9R1 M9xxPower9, 8 & 77042-OE1V8.8.7Power8, 7 & 67042-CR9V8.8.7Power9, 8 & 72.4 GHz16 GB.5 TB or 1 TB4617042-CR9V8.8.7Power8, 7 & 67042-CR9V8.8.6Power8, 7 & 67042-CR9V8.8.5Power8, 7 & 67042-CR9V8.8.4Power8, 7 & 67042-CR8V9R1 M9xxPower9, 8 & 72 GHz8 GB500 GB46117042-CR8V8.8.7Power8, 7 & 67042-CR8V8.8.6Power8, 7 & 67042-CR8V8.8.5Power8, 7 & 67042-CR8V8.8.4Power8, 7 & 67042-CR8V8.8.3Power8, 7 & 67042-CR8V8.8.2Power8, 7 &...
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IBM i Encryption for Data Protection and Privacy Compliance

ibm-i-data-protection IBM i Encryption Data Protection
It has only been a year, and the new data protection and privacy regulations have already hit a few companies with multi-million dollar fines. Every company with sensitive data on an IBM i (iSeries AS400) and has data protection and privacy requirements, should have implemented DB2 encryption already. Some of the companies seen in the news recently not only failed to secure personal data properly, could not accurately assess how much data was compromised, had a lax incident response plan and were slow to notify authorities. These factors all led to heavier fines, causing the total financial penalties to exceed 100s of millions dollars. The latest data security and privacy regulations like GDPR, PCI and NYCRR 500 extend globally, and have some pretty sharp teeth. GDPR’s data protection and privacy safeguards have garnered such high praise, most federal, state and local governments like California are modeling their new laws after it. These new data protection and privacy laws have put a lot of overdue responsibility on companies to take better care of our personal data. There are several aspects of the new data security and privacy laws that will affect how much a company will be fined, and will vary on the compliance regulation. So far, GDPR appears to be the strictest and has the costliest consequences with a maximum fine equal to 4% of a company’s revenue. The number of records exposed will be a significant factor when determining a fine, but even more importantly will be the extent and measure of data protections the company implemented to protect personal data. Put simply, companies better due their due diligence to secure personal data. The company fines that incurred the heaviest fines thus far, were incidents that involved unencrypted records. On the IBM i, DB2 database encryption is the most important data protection mechanism for data security and privacy compliance. Here is why. Regardless of how the data is accessed, used or where the data ends up, DB2 database encryption for IBM i provides data security and privacy protection from both internal and external threats. No other security access control mechanism provides this...
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Why Nutanix HCI is the ideal VM platform for Splunk SIEM

Nutanix-Product-Shot-3 Why Nutanix HCI is the ideal VM platform for Splunk SIEM
Most SIEM environments rely on a plethora of different servers, storage arrays, hypervisors and network interconnects to support their rapidly growing SOC environments. Likewise, most SIEMs also all have the same issues and concerns about performance, costs and time required to provision and manage storage growth. The primary problem is, the entire infrastructure the SIEM relies on is not integrated or even truly virtualized under a single unified architecture. As a result, administrators are stuck in a never ending battle of upgrading and adding more traditional technology for the same problems, and security analysts are constantly waiting for searches to complete until more resources are made available. The definition of “crazy” comes to mind. The solution? A hyperconverged infrastructure! You should consider and investigate all players in the HCI market place, but this article will be focusing on the proven leader, Nutanix. The Nutanix HCI for Enterprise Cloud can provide SIEM security analysts many times faster search results and administrators with a more scalable and economical infrastructure to grow a SIEM with minimal capex expenses. All SIEM deployments have three key bottlenecks to constantly monitor that affect event log ingestion, searching and retention. This article will explain the advantages of using Nutanix HCI Enterprise Cloud for Splunk, and addresses the common performance and cost issues that affect all SIEMs. Nutanix virtualizes all aspects of the hardware, delivering the most efficient use of all system resources that other VM solutions cannot provide for Splunk SIEM environments. The Nutanix HCI solution has a distributed architecture that shares all infrastructure resources and prevents any workload from depleting another node’s resources. It does not need or rely on expensive SAN, NAS storage, RAID groups or network switches. Nutanix Distributed Storage Fabric enables SIEM indexers and collectors to process data locally, monitors data access paths and places data in the optimal location and automatically moves hot, warm, cold and frozen data to the appropriate internal and external storage resources. The most frequently used data is access from the local node of VM memory and flash, providing maximum performance. Unlike other storage systems that will experience significant I/O bottlenecks,...
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IBM i 7.4 (V7R4) Details: Everything you need to know

IBM i 7.4 (V7R4) Details: Everything you need to know
IBM i V7R4 (7.4) OS400 enhancements and additions improve Power9 and Power8 system and DB2 database performance, security and availability. Details of OS400 V7R4 features and specifications for IBM i Power Systems are explained below in detail, and arranged by the following topics: Security, System Management, Networking, Availability, Application development, Miscellaneous features. IBM i V7R4 (7.1) release date is June 21, 2019. OS400 V7R4 is supported on IBM Power9 and Power8 processor systems, and is not supported on earlier IBM Power system processor generations. All IBM i customers should read the IBM 7.4 memo before upgrading to ensure compatibility and verify if discontinued support of any software, hardware products or features affects your system. IBM V7R4 hardware enhancement details can be read about here. IBM i SecurityIBM i Authority Collection A significant advancement for IBM i security is the new Authority Collection service feature, capable of analyzing object authorities of users and applications to ensure only the minimum required authorities are granted to run applications. By securing objects in an application with minimum authority required, security administrators can now safely remove unnecessary user authorities to objects used by an application. Most IBM i applications have excessive authorities granted to objects within the application. For instance, when an application gives *PUBLIC *CHANGE or *ALL authority for objects within an application, and accessing a DB2 file, when it only requires *USE authority to the data. Applications with unnecessary authorities creates security vulnerabilities by allowing users and other applications to make changes to data outside the application.   Authority Collection service captures data associated with the runtime authority checking built into IBM i security of OS400. The authority data collected is stored in a repository for displaying and analyzing the data and determine the minimum authority required to the objects the application need to run successfully. Minimum authority should be granted to objects as a best security practices require to protect against unauthorized access from outside the application.  IBM i 7.4 Authority Collection service also allows the collection of authority information for specific objects when accessed by any user, instead of for all objects accessed by a specific user....
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Power8 vs Power9 Performance Facts for IBM Model S924

ibm-power9-s924-9009-42a IBM Power9 S924 9009-42A Specifications
This specification breakdown of the IBM Power9 9009-42A model S924 will explain the key performance features that sets it apart from its Power8 predecessor.  In comparison to the 8286-42A model S824, the IBM Power9 S924 delivers 40-50% better performance for data intensive database and analytics workloads, with over twice the memory footprint (accelerated by Coherent Accelerator Processor Interface CAPI) running at speeds up to 344 GB/s (172 GB/s per socket), has over 60-70% more CPW for IBM i workloads and 2X the I/O bandwidth (Gen4 PCIe slots). IBM Power9 with CAPI 2.0 increased I/O bandwidth over 4X Power8 ability, clocked at 192 GB/s. The Power9 S924 also has PowerVM virtualization is built into the Power9 processor chip, which increases performance, server utilization and cloud enables your data. Power9 S924 9009-42A Specifications Power9 Processors – 2 socket server with up to 24 active cores EP1E 8-core (18,188-145,500 CPW)EP1F 10-core (17,450-174,500 CPW)EP1G 12-core (15,446-370,700 CPW) Memory - up to 4TB of DDR4 direct attached memory, 16 DIMM slots per socket EM62 – 16GB DIMM (Qty. 2-8 per socket = 2666 MHz / Qty. 10-16 per socket = 2133 MHz)EM63 – 32GB DIMM (Qty. 2-8 per socket = 2400 MHz / Qty. 10-16 per socket = 2133 MHz)EM64 – 64GB DIMM (Qty. 2-8 per socket = 2400 MHz / Qty. 10-16 per socket = 2133 MHz)EM65 – 128GB DIMM (Qty. 2-8 per socket = 2400 MHz / Qty. 10-16 per socket = 2133 MHz)L2 to L3 cache - 7 TB/s on chipPer core - 512 KB L2 | 10 MB L3 | 128 MB L4 PCIe Slots - Hot-plug, 4 CAPI 2.0 enabledTwo Gen4 and Six Gen3 (single socket)Five Gen4 and Six Gen3 (two socket) Storage backplane options (hot-swappable disk bays) EJ1C - 12 SFF-3 Bays + 1 RDX BayEJ1D - Expanded Function 18 SFF-3 Bays + Dual IOA with Write Cache and optional external SAS port Expanded FunctionEJ1E - Split feature to 6+6 SFF Bays + 1 RDX bax with ability to add a second SAS ControllerEJ1M - 12 SFF-3 Bays + RDX Bay and optional external SAS port. SSD and HDD options 600GB, 1200GB, 1800GB - 10K RPM SFF HDD300GB, 600GB - 15K...
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Nutanix Hardware for Hyper Converged Infrastructure (HCI)

nutanix-hardware-lenovo-hc_20190427-171927_1 Nutanix Hardware for HCI Lenovo
A hyper converged infrastructure (HCI) uses software to virtualize all server and storage resources for streamlining, automating and maximizing IT resources and operations for a variety of complex, compute-intensive Databases, VDI, Microsoft, Business Applications, Cloud, Big Data, SIEM, SYSLOG and other x86 environments. HCI virtualization solutions significantly reduce operating and licensing costs, provide predictable performance, provide up to 2.8 times storage gains and enables long-term flexibility and scalability. The HCI software defined infrastructure model addresses almost every IT challenge facing companies today, including:Improving IT staff productivityImproving operational efficiencyReducing capital expensesReducing operating expensesImproving backup/recoveryImproving resource utilizationData center consolidationThe value of hyper converged infrastructure solutions lies in moving away from a legacy hardware architecture consisting of multiple generations of servers, operating systems, hypervisors and storage devices from multiple vendors, to a more available, modernized solution that is software defined, cloud-like and an all-encompassing ecosystem. Some hyper converged infrastructure solutions have partnered with hardware vendors to provide an out of the box, ready to deploy hyper converged infrastructure that can enable deployment up to 85% faster. The industry’s leading HCI vendor Nutanix, partnered with the enterprise server leader Lenovo as its key hardware vendor, which offers the Lenovo ThinkAgile HX Series, a best in breed, all-in-one HCI solution with preloaded software defined storage licenses, hypervisors, consolidated maintenance and support. ThinkAgile Software for HX pairs Nutanix HCI solutions, Prism and Acropolis, with Lenovo server management solutions XClarity and ThinkAgile Network Administrator, to deliver single click provisioning, upgrades, management, software and firmware updates, and centralized monitoring of entire infrastructure from a single pane of glass. Most importantly, Nutanix virtualizes all cluster resources to work as a single, optimized and efficient system, eliminating the challenges of managing multiple interfaces. Every HCI system depends on reliable, performance capable, scalable servers to ensure critical business processes run smoothly and without interruption, which makes the Nutanix Lenovo marriage perfect. Lenovo Intel based x86 servers have been rated #1 for reliability for the last five years in a row, has the highest customer satisfaction rating and holds the world record for virtualization performance. Lenovo’s ThinkAgile HX Series servers harness many highly functional features for...
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QRadar IBM i iSeries AS400 Log Forwarding

qradar-ibm-i-iseries-leef-gid-offense-risk-score QRadar IBM i Offense
Configuring the IBM i to forward security and system event logs to QRadar SIEM can be done a few different ways, but in order to do it correctly; in LEEF format, in real-time, with GID and enriched event log information, you need an IBM i event log forwarding tool designed for the QRadar SIEM. There are IBM i security event log forwarding tools that can be used for QRadar that will send event logs in real-time and in CEF SYSLOG format, and even a couple that support LEEF, but only one includes QRadar QID for mapping, log enrichment and is on DSM support list. These features are important for QRadar's automatic log source discovery, parsing IBM i event logs properly for offenses, alerts and reports, and so that SOC operators can make sense of the logs. Similarly, all the IBM z Mainframe event log sources also require a forwarding tool that is able to format all the unique event log types and designed specifically for IBM QRadar. The IBM i has many different event log sources, of which most SYSLOG and SIEM forwarding tools can only format and send System Audit (QAUDJRN) and Message Queues like QHST. However, most companies will also need to forward other event log types for compliance and audit requirements, like sensitive database access logs for File Integrity Monitoring (FIM), Network, SQL Statements, Open Source protocols, Privileged Access Management (PAM) events, Port usage, and Commands issued from a workstation. Other logs sources that companies also sometimes forward are web application logs, third party application and performance data, but these log sources are not typically required. Before choosing your method or tool to forward your IBM i event logs to QRadar, first identity which event types need to be sent based on your compliance or audit requirements. Then, identify the solutions capable of formatting and forwarding those IBM i log sources correctly. Another important specification for IBM i QRadar integration, is the solutions ability to send all event details, not just certain fields and data the vendor or freeware deemed important. Sending security events to a SOC or...
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Top IBM Power Systems myths: x86 is the industry standard and Power is becoming obsolete

Top IBM Power Systems myths: x86 is the industry standard and Power is becoming obsolete
Share this post: There are many misconceptions about IBM Power Systems in the marketplace today, and this blog series will help to dispel some of the top myths. In my previous post, I put aside the myth that migrating from x86 to IBM Power Systems is costly, painful and risky. In this post, we’ll look at another myth suggesting that x86 architecture is the de-facto industry standard for all applications and that Power Systems will soon become obsolete. Myth versus reality To begin breaking down this myth, let’s consider how IBM Power Systems stands apart from x86. Designed for enterprise workloads. x86 is designed to accommodate multiple markets and design points, from smartphones to laptops, PCs and servers. Power Systems, on the other hand, is designed for high-performance, enterprise workloads like data analytics, artificial intelligence and cloud-native apps and microservices — workloads that are driving innovation and digital transformation in organizations today. Targeting new market segments. Over the years, x86 vendors shipped a lot of systems into commodity markets, but there have always been market segments it couldn’t get because of the limitations of its general-purpose architecture. Today, a growing number of market segments where just a few years ago x86 was the only solution available, are facing strong competition from Power Systems. Consider the number of clients who bought x86-based solutions for SAP HANA, Nutanix and open source databases like MongoDB, EDB PostgreSQL and Redis, to name a few. They didn’t buy x86 solutions because they were the best choice; they bought them because they were the only choice. SAP HANA is an excellent example. 2,500-plus clients now run this application on Power Systems instead of x86. Graphic represents the author’s perspective based on market intel These applications, plus the rising demand for data analytics, HPC infrastructure and cognitive solutions like AI, machine learning and deep learning, may be the most cogent examples of market segments x86 is struggling to keep. On the forefront of high-performance computing. In addition, two of the world’s most powerful supercomputers are running IBM POWER9: the US Department of Energy’s Summit and Sierra at Oak...
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