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IBM i Power9 System Pricing by Model Specification

IBM i Power9 System Pricing by Model Specification
IBM i customers upgrading to a new IBM Power9 scale-out system from an older Power system have three models to compare specifications; the 9009-41A S914, 9009-42A S924 or 9009-22A S922. Before jumping to any conclusions about which Power9 system is right for you, consider the specifications and resources of your current IBM i and performance during peak times. The new Power9 systems are so powerful, many companies are finding they can drop a software tier without any question. Dropping an IBM P-Group in itself is a significant cost savings, and the total cost of ownership price tag adds up after factoring in third-party, IBM software licenses, maintenance and support fees.First step to a Power9 upgrade and comparison, is knowing your current Power system’s capabilities and identifying the amount of system resources (CPW, Memory, HDD/SSD and I/O 'RAID Controller' requirements) needed for peak workloads. Contact us if you need any assistance getting the performance information off your IBM i. Once you have a baseline for current performance requirements and a grasp on your growth rates, we can then determine your Power9 System Upgrade options.All Power9 systems include a 3 year 9X5 warranty, with an option to upgrade to 24X7. The base Power9 warranty will contribute to the cost savings by comparing the estimated life expectancy of the Power9 to your current maintenance and support costs. Companies will vary in the number of years for this life cycle calculation, but most companies anticipate 3-5 years for a new Power system.All Power9 system models support PCIe Gen 4 and earlier PCIe generation feature cards. If I/O performance, response times and throughput are contributing factors for upgrading your IBM i, you should purchase new RAID Controllers and other SAS adapters, as the newer generation PCIe adapters provide significant performance gains. The Power9 systems all support 220V power, and the 9009-41A S914 can run on 110V. The Power9 models have three backplane options, a 12 SFF-3 Bays, a 18 SFF-3 bays with write cache or a 12 SFF-3 bays with dual IOA and write cache. IBM i workloads require 4k byte block hard disk drives or...
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IBM i Performance Optimization: Improving Application Response Times

IBM i Performance Optimization: Improving Application Response Times
Keeping your IBM i optimized for optimal response times requires regular monitoring of system resources and identifying various elements that affect application performance. Poor response times of only two or three seconds delay can quickly get compounded over time when poorly written applications are involved or database maintenance has been neglected. Like most performance degradation issues on the IBM i, response time issues only get worse as the number of transactions multiply. Ignoring system performance issues affects productivity and frustrate customers, which in turn increases costs and affects revenue. Below are some ideas to consider if a major IBM i upgrade is not a viable budgetary option. Consider the cost benefits of optimizing your IBM i system resourcesThe number one factor that affects response times is available processing power (CPU), and the most expensive resource in your IBM Power system. Even new Power9 systems can experience performance degradation. If your system is experiencing poor response times, keep an eye on capacity utilization throughout the day, and check how close CPU utilization gets to 100%, especially during peak periods of the day. If you spot a pattern, perhaps there are some jobs you can plan on running a different time of day when CPU is regularly underutilized. Any system administration and batch jobs that can be scheduled at lighter periods are good examples. Take note of the applications and types of jobs consuming the most CPU resources. If these jobs involve SQL, pay attention to the number of file opens they are performing. If this number is high for the system, the fix can be as simple as changing how the programs run queries to keep files open between calls. You also may consider using IBM i Workload Groups to control the amount of CPU, memory pools and sub-systems to ensure critical applications get the resources they need to run optimally, while restricting less important jobs from stealing their needed resources. Most IBM i systems contain between 15-40% of obsolete and unnecessary data consuming disk space, which is often due to poor database and spool file maintenance. Bloated databases will definitely impact response times...
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